Tour the Homestead on YouTube!

Hello!  Long time since we’ve updated the blog.  But, all for good reason. When the blog goes dormant…it means we’ve been busy!

The harvest is coming in strong.

Homeschool is underway.

The animals are lazily enjoying the autumn weather.

The pantry is being stocked with homemade canned goods of every kind.

Amazing time is being spent with friends.

The woodpile is large enough to sustain us through the winter.

But as the harvest season wraps up, more cozy time inside will be available and I’ll get back to writing, which I love as much as all the summer work (and it will be a well needed break)!  If only there were more time in the day for all the things we love the most, right?

Chores are calling, so let me get to the point of this blog.  Tim and I, the kids, and the homestead….well, we’re on YouTube!  No, no….we didn’t start a YouTube channel.  But we were visited by new friends who have a popular homesteading channel on YouTube.  We didn’t know it, but they brought their camera and asked us if we didn’t mind filming a bit with them.  We said “yes!”. The final product was a real treat for us!  What a beautiful gift to capture the homestead in this format, which has not been done before. We celebrated a year here on the homestead in June, so watching this video which was filmed just a few months later is making me feel proud of all our hard work and accomplishments. I hope you enjoy watching the video as much as we did:

CLICK HERE TO WATCH: They LEFT THE CITY to Homestead & Live the YURT LIFE

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Love, Peace & Nature,

-L

 

 

The Totem Tree at the Yurt

A totem is a symbol that represents a story. Every one of us has a story, we may also have ideas in our minds that involves changing/elevating/improving our current story.  It could be something large (making a big change in life to make a personal dream come true) or something that seems less significant (finding more organized ways to live minimally). No matter how insignificant or overwhelming an idea seems, making it come true – essentially, creating a new story – can mean achieving something you’ve always hoped for or perhaps bring a new outlook on life. Embracing personal growth is something I’ve spent a good time in my adult life doing (disclaimer: not always successfully!). I always seem to have ideas in my mind that will help me better myself, or work towards a new goal.  I don’t always succeed, but keeping my focus on the idea or ideas allows me to more likely achieve what I’m aiming for. I’ve learned that having visual reminders is an essential to my success, and this is why I developed the idea of having a totem tree here at White Sky Woods. I have never seen a totem tree before, so maybe I have a fresh concept here (but probably not – haha!).

A few weeks ago, I introduced the idea of a totem tree to my family. The concept is to have a totem tree that visually reminds us of goals, changes we hope for, etc. The visual reminder is a scrap of fabric tied to the branches of our chosen tree. Our neighbor is a quilter and she generously donated fabric scraps for our purpose. Each scrap of fabric hung on the totem tree is a symbol for a big idea, dream, thought, wish, or goal that we have. The totems are colorful reminders to us, symbols of who we are and what we desire from life. It is a place for positivity only, and it lacks ideas of materialism.

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Totem Tree overlooking our Yurt at White Sky Woods.

The kids and I went looking for the perfect totem tree and we found a beautiful blooming apple tree that will be seen daily and also by guests that visit. We decided to extend our totem tree to any visitors that would like to join us. The fabric scraps were put in a ziplock bag with a description of what a totem tree is along with these instructions:

Join us if you like! Write your big idea, dream, or goal on the unprinted side of the fabric scrap you choose. Or, if you’d prefer to keep your idea to yourself, keep your fabric blank. Find the totem tree and tie your totem to a branch. Now, you’ve put your big ideas out to the universe by sharing it on our totem tree!

After a few visits from friends, we have some beautiful fabric scraps hanging from our tree, swaying in the wind as a reminder of the activity it takes for us to reach our goals. I love this idea and I hope you do to.  If you visit, please, participate in our totem tree!  If you like, comment below….what big idea, dream, or goal would you write down to tie to the totem tree?

Peace, Love and Nature,

-L

Don’t miss a thing that goes on at our homestead!  Follow us here, or here!  You can also subscribe to the blog!

Homesteading Year One, A Brief Memoir

One year ago, we sold our house, packed up a big moving truck, and made the 4.5 hour drive north that we had so many times before…but this time it was a monumental trip.  It represented the end of certain aspects of life as we knew it….including Lisa’s retirement from her career, no more traditional school for the kids, no more daily commute for Tim, no more mortgage payments, and no more neighbors (well, at least ones that live closer than 1 mile away).  Each thing we left behind was purposeful and had a huge gain for us – the ability to live simply, to homestead for our goal of sustaining our family with food and local resources.

But, we really had no idea of the many other experiences and gains we would get from this life change.  The ones that broadly stand out to me as I look back on year one:

  • The Keweenaw Community.  I am so excited to have the time now to actually participate in like-minded events in the community. We’ve attended events, performances, and learning opportunities.  I am unsure if I somehow was unaware of these types of events taking place in our old community, but here I feel that there is so much to do and participate in that I couldn’t possibly find time to do it all! Along the way we’ve met so many awesome people and now we’re meeting people who are asking us “are you the family that lives in a yurt in Jacobsville?”  “Why yes, that’s us.”
  • Winter. We were warned. We were asked “are you actually living out here all winter?”  Well, one of the worse winters in the past years (at least this is what the locals told us) took place….over 300 inches of snow during the season and WE SURVIVED!  Not only did we survive but we loved it. Other than the situation where I attempted to drive my tiny car through a huge drifting snow bank less than a mile from home, got stuck and then had Tim come to my rescue with truck, in which he also got stuck….winter went very smoothly.  (Major thanks to our neighbor with the plow truck and tow to save us both!)
  • Wandering. In the past year, we’ve had more flexibility for travel.   We took 2 amazing trips – Wyoming for the Solar Eclipse and Florida/Alabama.  We’ve also done more wandering around the Upper Peninsula and the Keweenaw area. We’ve seen breathtaking views, and enjoyed learning about local history, geology, and the natural environment around us.
  • Joys and trials of raising our own food. Our first year garden, while small, helped provide about 1/4 of the food we need to sustain our family. This year, we hope to bring it to 1/2 – 3/4.  This is now helped by our chickens, ducks, and pigs who provide eggs and meat.  Having the animals has been enjoyable but we also had some hardships with the natural circle of life.  Life and death, success and failure is all part of living a homesteading life – and for that reason I mark all these learning experiences as gains (not losses). Plus, how many people can say they’ve chased a pig in their pajamas?  Well, true story, I can – haha!
  • Homeschooling.  This year, my children and I became a team! We learn together, we fail together. We have life experiences together.  We have honest conversations and are learning to understand each other better than we’ve ever had the opportunity to before since we were apart for so much of the day.
  • Friends. A fear I had with this change was being able to meet new people to develop friendships with. We’re kinda isolated out here and add in being an introvert, I was worried we would not meet new friends.  Friends for Tim and me.  Friends for the kids. Well, I can laugh in the face of that fear. Not only have we met new people, but we’ve developed new, amazing friendships.  Friends who understand and embrace our homesteading lifestyle.  Friends who have skills they can share with us and that we can share back other skills in return. Holding close friendships that remain from prior to our move and developing new friendships has been the most soulful gain of all in year one.

We have daily trials, we are human after all.  But even with that, are we living our dream life? Yes! Our yurt is a cozy, small home that embraces us.  Our homestead is a lively, entertaining place that provides for us. Our community provides us with people and opportunities we learn from and feel part of.

Homestead life year one recap = damn, life is beautiful.

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Springtime Blueberry Blossoms!

Peace, Love and Nature,

-L

Don’t miss a thing that goes on at our homestead!  Follow us here, or here!  You can also subscribe to the blog!

 

Puzzled by Minimalism, Creative Solutions!

So, I had this image of sitting around getting snowed in for our first winter here. Afterall, even locals laughed at the idea of us living out here in winter. Our UPS delivery woman politely asked last November, “are you actually staying here all winter?”  With all the warnings of a “Yooper” winter, you can see why we thought our winter would be relaxed….no where to go, nothing to do. Afterall, our area gets an average of 250+ inches of snow annually. Yet, it’s now March and I don’t recall this whole sitting around thing happening.  What actually happened is that Tim picked up more hours on the job, I started and finished my certification as a Medical First Responder, and our kids kept busy with friends, activities, and lots of playtime in the snow. We’ve also done a lot of snowshoeing and exploring around our property, which looks so different in winter.

 

Maybe, in my wildest dreams, I was hoping winter would be an excuse to be lazy…but, it hasn’t exactly panned out. I won’t complain, because I do like keeping busy, within reason. Well, part of my lazy winter dream was to have a puzzle to work on at any whim. I like puzzles – they are relaxing, you can still have conversation while you do it, and you can come and go from it as you please. Plus, I think it’s good for the mind to be able to focus on details. Winter is the perfect time to do a puzzle when you might be stuck inside due to bad weather (although we’ve found that bad weather doesn’t stop us).

But, we have a slight problem with this puzzle idea. We are 4 people living in a yurt, and we don’t have a ton of “free space” to just set up a puzzle and have it sitting around all the time. We can’t build it on our kitchen table, because that’s where we eat. Getting a second table isn’t an option because we don’t have space, plus we try not to have anything here that isn’t really a necessity, attempting to live more minimally. So, time for some creative problem solving, gosh I love that (I’m not being sarcastic here). How can we build a puzzle without taking up current needed areas, and without getting something new or taking up more space?

Easy, time to retrofit our kitchen table into a puzzle table and kitchen table! This was my idea, and Tim made my concept come true. Our kitchen table is nothing special, so taking it apart was low risk.

First, the table top was removed.  I’ll be honest, parents with young children…if you haven’t looked UNDER your table lately, I recommend against it unless you think you really need to know.  I scrubbed off some things that, oh boy, I have no idea what they were.

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Removed table top.

 

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Table without top. Ready to put in secondary puzzle table top.

Then, Tim built a table within the table that would be the space for our puzzle. It’s 4 sided, so bonus that no puzzle pieces should fall off while being worked on!

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Table top built under original table top.

Lastly, the table top was fitted with properly placed dowels so that when put back ontop, it would not slide off. And just like that, it was time to work on the puzzle! When done, just put the table top back on! Unless you knew, there is no telling there is a puzzle “in” the table”. The table is not huge, so for 1-2 adults, the top is easily removed and leaned up against the wall.

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Time to put the first puzzle together!

I was giddy with joy to see my idea of a puzzle table come to fruition. <–Geek.

Looking forward to spending downtime at this table as a family.  This puzzle is too complex for our 3-year old, but our 8-year old is already having a good time with it!

Viva la puzzle table!

Peace, Love and Nature,

-L

Oh, be sure not to miss a thing that goes on at our homestead!  Follow us here, or here!

 

 

 

Journey Toward Minimalism – Part 1

Good morning from our yurt on the beautiful and snowy Keweenaw Peninsula. I’m having a peaceful moment right now – sitting at the kitchen table, writing this blog next to the woodstove with it’s crackling fire. All of my family is sleeping, except our dog who follows me everywhere, what a loyal boy he is. This moment of peace is a real oddity in our home, so I must breathe in every moment of it.

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Finding my peace involves this warm, crackling fire.

This morning I woke up to a few text messages on my phone that arrived after I fell asleep. Tim and I took a 3 mile off-road snowshoe blazing our own trail, so it was early bedtime for me! The messages were from a friend and she was asking: “When did you begin your minimalist journey?” and “Or, have your always been a minimalist?”

From new friends on the Keweenaw that have visited us at our yurt, this idea of minimalism have been a common comment. Several have stated how we are living as minimalists, and even saying that seeing our home has encouraged them to realize that they have too much stuff and has motivated them to start going through their own homes and downsizing.

This pleases my heart, but it also strikes me, because although we do have a lot less stuff in our home than the average person, I still feel like we have a lot of stuff! Although I realize, compared to the average home, we do not. Here are some of the ways we got to where we are at now.

Phase 1:

Were we always minimalists? NO! I truly laugh out loud at this, thinking of the absurd amount of useless stuff we had. Our journey toward minimalism started when we conjured up this dream to live here at White Sky Woods in a unconventional home – a yurt. We realized we needed to stop spending money so that we could save the money to make these dreams come true. Our goal was to come debt free. We also were on a mission to learn more self-sustaining skills, like making food from scratch, including items like yogurt. These actions saved quite a bit of money and were suitable to a more frugal lifestyle. Saving every we dollar possibly could, eliminating bills, but still giving ourselves some leeway for life enjoyment – like traveling (I can’t live without this). This encompassed around 7 years.  The behavioral changes didn’t take place overnight, but slowly over that time. Small choices over time made a big impact. Two rules of thumb that we used:

  • Don’t buy it unless you NEED it.  No new stuff unless it was absolutely necessary.
  • If you do NEED it, try Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, thrift stores or consignment shops first. This is not only often a more frugal choice, but it’s better for the environment too because it creates less demand for new product which uses a lot of resources to be made, shipped, etc.

Phase 2:

As our dreams to move here became more of a reality, the pending home sale and move really got us in gear. At this point, we started to dowsize. We looked at everything and asked, is this a WANT or a NEED? Pretty much all that was a WANT was donated or sold. The stuff that we felt was a NEED remained until it was time to pack.

I want to say, this is not always an easy step. I am not very attached to things, but we have two children, and helping them downsize was a step-by-step process of getting them involved and helping them understand the value of WHY we are doing this. Our youngest was 2 at the time and fairly clueless to the changes, but our oldest was 7 and some things were a little harder for her.

Another tricky thing is downsizing personal possesions that you acquire through life, like papers your wrote in school, yearbooks, awards, etc. Tim and I both downsized into 1 bin. During this process we created a lot of waste – but I don’t think that anyone really would have been interested in buying my 1996 Hartford Union High School Yearbook.  Ha! Some of it had to be tossed because it didn’t have a place in our future. For the record I did keep the Yearbook from my gradutating year, which my children enjoy looking at!

Some items we had were left from family members who have passed or items that were novelties/memories from vacations taken. These were also hard to make decisions about. Some of it was repurposed, Grandma’s teecup collection for instance. Some will become bird feeders, and other will be put into use in our daily life. The remainder that we did not feel compelled to keep were donated and some other person will fall in love with their beauty.

Phase 3:

Once again upon our move, we asked the same question as we packed everything – is this a want or a need? We also focused the question even more:

  • Does this item serve me in my lifestyle?

An easy example of this is that I had a career before we moved, and now homesteading and homeschooling is my career.  These take very different wardrobes. All of my business professional clothes, shoes, and accessories were donated.

We also asked another question regarding the bigger items:

  • Do we have room for this?

We sold quite a bit of furniture pieces because we would not have room. I do not do well with visual clutter, so my goal with our new home was to have only what we needed and to be certain that the stuff we had was useful. An example of this is that we have 2 large trunks. We also had 2 end tables in our living room. The end tables hold very little stuff, the trunks hold a lot. So, we got rid of the end tables and kept the trunks. The trunks now serve as a furniture piece and a storage piece! Winning.

At this rate, I don’t feel like a true minimalist, but I realize that compared to the average family of 4, we are. This coming summer we will be taking another look at everything in the house and garage and once again going through the process. If we haven’t used it in a year of living here, there is a good chance we don’t need it. I’m wildly looking forward to this honestly!

If the idea of minimalism interests you, here are some of the resources we’ve used in support of our journey.

Stay tuned for a follow-up blog to this which will address our challenges with minimalism and a roster of things we’ve done to get creative with living in a small space.

Don’t miss a beat of our journey, subscribe to the blog and join us on social media:  Facebook, Instagram.

Wishing you Peace, Love and Nature,

-L

3 Ways to Warm Yourself in Winter

The sun is shining, but darn….it’s COLD! 1 degree Farenheit, but feels like -11 with the windchill. Thank goodness for the routine of heading outside in the morning and evening to care for our animals, otherwise I’m not sure I would have any reason to leave the house on days this cold. For the first few minutes of pig and chicken chores, I actually like the cold air. It’s a definite wake-me-up! But, when my fingers and toes start to tingle, then the enjoyment fades. So far, our 2 pigs and 7 chickens seem to be hanging in there. Our hens are still laying eggs! Now that’s a superpower.

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Happy, snowy pigs.

Over the past 2 months we’ve had our share of snow (about 2 1/2 feet of snow on the ground here, but other local areas have experienced MUCH more). We’ve also had our share of fluctuating temperatures, ranging from 39 degrees to -20 degrees Farenheit. During our first winter here in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, we’re quickly learning some important ways to stay warm.

1.) Wear the right clothes for the weather!

I’m doing my best to embrace the Norwegian Quote: “There is no bad weather, just bad clothing.” I’ve quickly learned that what counts is wearing layers. At any given time, including inside, I have 3 layers on my top and 2 on my bottom. It seems obvious maybe, but this really makes a difference – albeit a pain in the butt for getting dressed, getting undressed, and doing laundry!  Warm socks and a decent underlayer are necessities. For outdoor chores I’ve also decided that looking scary in my balaclava is a must for warmth. It freaks out the kids, but my face stays oh so warm!

2.) Being “lazy” is okay!

I used to think that watching movies or lingering around the house for too long was being lazy. But, this slow down is exactly what winter here is all about. It also has allowed us to have more time to start new habits doing things that always were pushed aside before because we didn’t have time.

Our homeschool Nature Journal for instance. The kids are having a fun time with it, but I think I am equally or more engaged with it! Sometimes we are inspired from trips outside, but on very cold days we observe from our windows – taking time to enjoy the chickadees, or the deer and turkey that have now become very comfortable with yurt life as well.

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3.) Nothing warms you up more than good friends.

On New Years Day we hosted our first annual “Dessert at the Yurt”. I prepared several sweet treats that were themed by our homestead (made with goods from our own garden) or inspired by the Keweenaw area. For instance, “Not Your Garden Variety Zucchini Bread”, a Chocolate Zucchini Bread and “Snow on Top Basalt”, Oreo Trifle. The food was good, but the company was even better. Since our move in June, we’ve had the pleasure of meeting so many good people here on the Keweenaw and growing friendships with them.

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First Annual “Dessert at the Yurt”

Worried about space in our yurt, we managed to comfortably fit 17 adults and 8 kids! During and reflecting afterwards, our hearts were so warm. We have so much gratitude and love for our new community and friends. We have not experienced such an amazing community before. So many brilliant minds and beautiful souls surrounded us at this gathering. How is it possible to not feel warmed (hypothetically, of course) when surrounded by that?

One friend described the yurt as “wrapping it’s warm arms around you.”  Yes!

Wishing you winter warmth.

Peace, Love and Nature,

-L

 

Move (mostly) complete!

Hear ye, hear ye.  Or, perhaps since we now live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan it should be, “Ya Der Hey, Ya Der Hey!” Really, I write that with nothing but love for the stereotypical “yooper” accent.

Well, we made the leap in our decision (read more here if you missed it), and now we are officially moved from Wrightstown, WI to the beautiful Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan. As with any move, there were a lot of details.  But I’ll spare you.  Here are the amazing highlights:

We had a going away party.  Friends and family showed up.  We ate good food, had good stories, and made new memories.  It was a great send-off.

I finished my last day at work (after almost 13 years) and was surprised with an AMAZING 30-minute “The Office” themed going away video.  What an thoughtful project completed by co-workers.  I was feeling the love, big time – still am.  Thank goodness for technology to keep in touch.  Final day selfie stick photo below.

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I had a great final lunch with Joe and Danica, the owners of Prophit Marketing. They have provided me an amazing experience and wonderful work family over the past 12+ years.

Lunch with Joe and Danica.

Flora finished off her almost 3 year run with Conquer Martial Arts by being part of the Little Chute Cheesefest Parade (yes, this is a festival…..about cheese). She’s excited to start her new karate school here in the Copper Country.

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Our home was sold! Insert HUGE sigh of relief. We hope this home and neighborhood is everything to the new couple moving in that it has been to us. We will miss that amazing Fox River view and access, but we’ve moved on to something better suited for us 🙂 If you need a realtor in the Green Bay or Fox Valley area, call the guy below (Mike Pritzl).  He was so diligent, honest, and organized.  Thank you Mike!

Home Sold

We packed and packed and packed and…..

Ugh.

But it got done, and on Friday, 6/9/17, off we went!

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About 5 hours later we arrived and promptly unpacked.

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We are still finishing up some odds and ends of unpacking, so future post to be made on how our yurt looks inside as our home and not a construction zone 🙂

It hasn’t been even a week yet, but I can say, it feels right. Today, Flora said “I’m so glad we moved here.” Ditto my love.  Ditto.

Occupancy Approval – Yes to Yurt Living!

A big thing happened for us this week. The absolute final inspection to approve our yurt for occupancy took place. Over the course of the last 3’ish years, we’ve had lots of inspections along the way.  I’m guessing that most people who are “building” their own home have very little thought about the multiple inspections they are subject to; that’s because they have contractors and builders, electricians, plumbers, etc. who have to deal with all inspections.  In our case, Tim served as all the aforementioned people. With the exception of 2 things (well drilling and septic system), all the work from prepping the land to laying the foundation to framing walls, pulling electrical wires, installing all plumbing, and every single other thing was completed by Tim with the help of a few willing people along the way – like me!

Since the passing of an inspection was truly the judgement of Tim’s hard work, he felt all the pressure of needing to pass the inspections along the way.  He was especially eager to get the news of the final electrical and final plumbing inspections – which were approved last week.

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Spiral Staircase leading up to the loft.

After finishing the spiral staircase, it was time for the final inspection, the one earning us the final permit to occupy.  Pretty big deal!  And he earned a big – APPROVED!

It feels so special to truly have built our own home from start to finish. Flora, who’s 7, thinks that it’s a pretty normal thing 🙂  What a beautiful naivety.  Tim’s incredible ability to build anything he puts a plan to is nothing short of outstanding!

We hope that the next big news we get is a good offer on our current home for sale on the beautiful Fox River. We are selling so that we can make our move to homesteading and full time cozy yurt living.

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Home sweet yurt.

Join us on our adventure by following this blog, or here or here or here.  Wishing you peace, love, and nature.

Edit on 4.29.17 – just had to add a picture of the final notice to the blog 🙂

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Wood Stove Refurb Project

Over the past years as we’ve been building at White Sky Woods, we’ve been gifted two wood stoves from different family members. Both stoves were in working condition, but needed some TLC.  As we continued to plan our home, we decided that we’d like to have a wood stove as supplemental heat. We have radiant in-floor heating which we predict will be the main supplier of heat.  The in-floor heating is run by electric, so to offset costs we’ll be able to burn wood heat. Eventually our goal is to supply the in-floor heating energy via solar hot water, but it will be a little bit of time to save up for that investment.

After investigating both wood stoves that we have, we decided to go with the smaller wood stove based on its condition (an easier refurbishing project) and also based on it being a better sized fit for the space we have for it (it’s smaller, more compact).

We will be moving the other wood stove with us and we have some ideas on how we plan to use it.  More to come on that once we get to that project!

While we regretfully forgot to take a BEFORE picture, the best way to describe this stove was rusty and old looking.   But, look at her now 🙂

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Outside with the first fire after refurb to “cure”.

Tim’s synopsis of the work he did:

  • took apart every individual piece of the wood stove
  • used a wire brush to get the rust off (it had rust on the inside and outside)
  • replaced all rope gaskets for a more efficient seal
  • applied stove polish
  • put it all back together
  • recaulked all joints
  • took it outside and started a fire to cure the polish with the heat

Total cost of the refurbish: Approximately $18.

Total time: Approximately 6 hours.

Can’t wait to put her to work!